Lot #17109

The Jewish Bride By Jozef Israëls

estimate: $1400 - $1800

starting price: $700

closing price: $

Description: Signed, dated 1909 and inscribed (lower right). Also inscribed in Dutch by the first buyer of the work with comments about it (on the cardboard on the back of the frame – see close-up).
technique: Charcoal highlighted with white chalk on paper
description: Signed, dated 1909 and inscribed (lower right). Also inscribed in Dutch by the first buyer of the work with comments about it (on the cardboard on the back of the frame – see close-up).
Dimension: 39 x 28 cm
condition: Good
provenance: Estate of Prof. Victor Deutsch
notes: This work is a preparation sketch for the oil painting "Jewish Wedding", which is in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.
biography

Jozef Israels (1824-1911) Painter and etcher, The Hague School, Holland. One of the premier late nineteenth century artists of Holland, often called the "Dutch Millet." Born on January 27, 1824 in Groningen in the Netherlands to Jewish parents. At the age of 16 he moved to Amsterdam and studied under Cornelis Kruseman in the Fine Art Academy in Amsterdam. Israels left Holland for Paris in 1845, living there for three years and frequenting the salons of Vernet and Delaroche. His main teacher in Paris, however, was Francois Edouard Picot. Israels established his reputation at the Parisian salons during the 19th Century, achieving great acclaim, including numerous medals. Initially influenced by Romanticism, Israels first established his reputation as a historical painter. Later, he turned his talents to landscape painting but it wasn't until the Paris Exposition of 1878 that the true genius of Jozef Israels became apparent. Here, for the first time, were those powerful studies of peasant life on which his fame now rests. He received First Prize at both Expositions Universelles in 1889 and 19, and was elected member of the Institute de France on January 3, 188. Joseph Israels' paintings are in the permanent collection of museums worldwide, including national collections in Amsterdam, Dordrecht, Glasgow, Groningen, The Hague, Leyde, Montreal, Moscow, Munich, and Rotterdam. He died on August 1, 1911 in The Hague. Probably the most important member of the Hague School, Israels shaped the course of Dutch art during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.